The Three Members of the Godhead are Equally Divine

Having considered that God is one and that there are three distinct persons within the Godhead, it is important to know where Scripture presents the members of the Godhead as sharing in the divine nature equally, meaning that one is not somehow more divine than another and underscoring that all three members are fully and equally one-and-the-same God. The most distinct example of this occurs at the end of Matthew’s gospel, when Christ gave instructions for baptizing new disciples (Matt 28:19). The church should baptize “in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit.” This instruction certainly re-echoes the baptism of Jesus, which has already been cited as evidence for the triune God (Matt 3:12-174:17).[22] Yet it also features a significant grammatical detail, which is the way that Jesus used a singular form for the word name, even though a plurality of three persons follow. Whereas the reader would normally expect him to say, “in the names of…,” he used the singular form instead, followed by the threefold reference to the persons of the Godhead. This unusual grammatical arrangement indicates both unity (one God, from “the name”) and plurality (three divine Persons) within the Godhead.

Scripture presents the members of the Godhead as sharing in the divine nature equally, meaning that one is not somehow more divine than another and underscoring that all three members are fully and equally one-and-the-same God.

Beyond this clear witness to the three-in-one Godhead by Jesus Christ himself, other examples also emerge. Paul names the three persons of the Godhead in equal function and association with one another at the close of a New Testament letter (2 Cor 13:14). One commentator highlights the significance of this pronouncement:

“Paul’s final benediction mentions blessings that all three members of the Trinity bring: grace from Christ, love from God, and koinonia of the Holy Spirit. Paul does not elaborate a doctrine of the Trinity, but as a Jew he would not offer such a blessing in the name of anyone but the one God.”[23]

This observation underscores the significance of this triune blessing as support for three equally divine persons within the Godhead. It also underscores the significance of a similar allusion at the beginning of this same letter to the Corinthians (2 Cor 1:21-22), in addition to similar trinitarian references in four other Pauline epistles (Rom 8:9-11Gal 4:4-61 Cor 6:1112:4-6Eph 1:313-142:183:14-174:4-6) and one general epistle (Jude 20-21). So indeed, Scripture presents one God as three distinct persons who share the same divine essence equally.

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