Voting for a President

If you are a voting United States citizen and a born-again Christian, which presidential candidate, if any, should receive your vote? Any candidate has flaws. In fact, any candidate will inevitably be a horrible sinner, though sometimes this is more obvious and beyond doubt.

To be sure, a president is neither your pastor nor your friend. Neither is he or she somehow a representative for all that you believe. A president is merely the government official who executes the laws of the land.

Countless people throughout history have never been able to vote for a president to govern their nation, as we are privileged to do. But once we elect a president, we are obligated to submit to and respect that president for the duration of his or her term (Romans 13:1-7, 1 Peter 2:13-17), except when they mandate personal disobedience to God (Acts 5:27-29). Furthermore, we are obligated to pray for our president (1 Timothy 2:1-2). But for what purpose?

That we may lead a quiet and peaceable life in all godliness and honesty. For this is good and acceptable in the sight of God our Saviour; who will have all men to be saved, and to come unto the knowledge of the truth. (1 Timothy 2:2-4)

We must pray for our executive government officials, whether president or governor, to make choices regarding social law that will allow born-again Christians to preach the gospel publicly and live the gospel privately. We must pray for our elected officials to govern our nation in a way that grants peace and freedom for conscientious Christian living and outreach.

We must pray for our executive government officials, whether president or governor, to make choices regarding social law that will allow born-again Christians to preach the gospel publicly and live the gospel privately.

Wouldn’t it be nice to have a president who is a born-again Christian, with a lifestyle that reflected the grace of the gospel? But if we do not have this option, then we should privately vote (or not vote) in a way that increases the odds for the public candidate with the greater potential for granting Christian freedoms. It really is that simple. After all, when the dust of another presidential election has settled, we will know which new president we’ll be praying for next.

We should privately vote (or not vote) in a way that increases the odds for the public candidate with the greater potential for granting Christian freedoms. It really is that simple.

The hurricane of news stories and popular opinion easily obscures this core principle. So look past the emotion and flurry of trending headlines and hashtags, and ask the simple question: with the options presented to me, which course of action as a voting, U.S. citizen will be most favorable to laws and decisions being made in answer to the core principle of 1 Timothy 2:2-4, because that is how you will be praying for the next four years.

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